New active preload reduction

https://www.triumphmotorcycles.com/for-the-ride/news/motorcycles/tiger-1200-update-2023-08-24

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Anything that allows more people to ride these adventure bikes must be a good thing. I presume Triumph wouldn’t allow the ride to be compromised for the lower settings.

Hmmmm. Ive seen other manufacturers doing this but I don’t know how it’s implemented. If it were an option you could turn on and leave on so the bike lowered itself when coming to a stop, that could be useful. But having to press and hold a button while coming to a stop means both your hands are busy (one second is a long time in these situations), or having to perceive every stop and remember to activate it in time, every time… its a nope from me. Why are Triumph so crap with electronics? This is a good idea for a lot of people but it’s implemented so poorly. A bit like when they went keyless but you had to fish around for the key to open the petrol tank :rofl:

I think HD’s Pan American does it automatically based on speed, like you I think having to hit a button for 1 seconds makes it prity much useless as by the time it lowers you’ll already be on your arse. Now doubt MCN will love it though :rofl:

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Well, that. I find it annoying I can’t have my fog lights on in combination with the DRL, and am not able to flash my headlight with the dipped beam on. Little niggles I know, but all the same.

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My biggest annoyance is the rider modes, not being able to change to the more aggressive ones without having to stop the bike, then they default back to the most restrictive ones every time you turn it off. And they don’t let you wheelie unless you turn off TC completely. I’m talking about the sporty roadsters here. By their nature they are ment to be fun, sporty, a bit of a hooligan, but Triumph think otherwise.

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Really? You can change modes on bikes from the mothership on the fly via the mode button on the RH bar cluster, press it repeatedly to scroll through the options rain, road, dynamic etc until you find the one you want then either close the throttle fully or pull in the clutch leaver and job’s a good un… you can also change the suspension settings on the fly too in the same way. The only thing you have to stop for is if you want to change the rear preload between min, auto and max. They stay the same when you turn the ignition off and back on too.

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I can do all that on mine - this is about lowering the bike by means of adjusting preload, and therefore the cog, which could be nice with lower speeds.

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Ahaaa… I was replying to Andy’s post which to a owner from the darkside like me seemed about the modes, not suspension settings. As far as the sussy pension is concerned unless manufacturers fit lowering stuff that’s automatic like HD do on the Pan America there doesn’t seem much point. If the seat is uncomfortably high off terra firma then factory lowered bikes are an alternative. All my ditch pumps have been factory lowered by 50mm via a mix of shorter springs and the seat and it does make a big difference to those of us who are vertically challenged.

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We went for a little local ride yesterday, I would normally have used the Triumph but took the Beemer specially to check this. My S1000XR has auto or min (no max) on the suspension button and confirmed as you say that min setting can only be selected at a standstill with the engine running (damping and engine modes are selectable on the move).
What the hell were BMW thinking, min is about as much use as a chocolate fire screen! If you need the bike lower when coming to a stop it’s too late after the event, you’ve already fallen over. :laughing:
At least they got the keyless fuel cap right, more than Ducati and Triumph have managed (in the past?)
I wonder if BMW will issue a software update like Triumph are doing? Having said that it barely makes a noticeable difference, and sounds like the Triumph offering is likewise - “up to 20mm” - so probably mostly less.

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That works on my Tiger without issues.

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Yes, thought they might have added that by now. My 2013 Multistrada didn’t, and I believe early “keyless” Triumph’s also required the key for their fuel caps. Really annoying if it’s half and half, wondering which pocket you put the key, at least our older Speedies you know where the key is. :slightly_smiling_face: :+1:

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Most of the time… :rofl:

100% An absolute farce having a keyless ignition then needing a key to fuel up. Nothing at all wrong with the “old fashioned” procedure :rage:

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I had this on my Multistrada. The key could stay in my pocket most of the time but not all of the time. So a partial success in my book.

Back when I had mine Ducati offered a keyless flap as an accessory (about £200 IIRC), being typical Italian electronics it was notoriously unreliable and owners routinely carried an allen key to remove the assembly when stuck at the filling station with an unresponsive flap. :joy:
Interestingly BMW have taken this a step further with a special removable section, so only 2 screws to remove, AND the required tool is in the supplied tool kit.
German engineering :roll_eyes: :laughing:

Nobody wants an unresponsive flap

Not keen on a removable section either

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I didn’t realise Triumph were adding this feature to existing bikes, so good on them in that respect! Nice to see they are not just selling it on new models. So close, but no cigar

The fuel cap or the suspension feature, Andy?

The fuel cap already opens keyless on my Tiger, up until 30 seconds after power off.

The suspension feature should be implemented with the next software update - I’ve booked one as the Tiger sometimes switches off when fully closing the throttle. A known issue, apparently, and not much fun when approaching a hairpin bend… I’ll be able to tell you more after the update, booked for September 14th…

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