New member question

Thanks for the acceptance to the group…
Afternoon from a new UK member.
So ive been riding a 125 for past year or so and now just passed motorcycle theory and hoping to be on the road on a propper bike april/ may after my DA corse but my question is this .
When i passed my driving test my father always usto say if you can drive a big car from the start you will get usto any size vehicles afterwards ,
Sooooooooo ,
From riding a 125cc chineese (or none english) bike whats the views on passing test and going onto a triumph sprint 955i ST (2004) as a first bike . Its not new but i like it. A few friends that ride already have said its going to be to big and bulky for me to handle with me only being 5ft9 ish and not really rode a big bike yet but im unsure . Never know till i try i suppose . Ive never had to deal with bike servicing my self but with this being my first big bike im going to do everything i can myself like oils and filters , gearbox oil , coolant , the basics for now untill i understand everything more , everyone has to start somewhere x

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Hi and welcome. :smiley: I’ve never ridden a sprint, so can’t help you there. My first bike was a Honda 550 SS, which was fairly powerful. I’d say go for the bike you want and just ride with common sense.

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Exactly vulpes .
Thats just what i said .
I never wanted anything fast but i was looking for comfort that i could ride for miles and be free. Like go for weekend now and again to scotland / wales , lakes . Mabie not straight away but give it a few weeks / months ,
Cheers for the reply

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Welcome to the forum :+1:

My first bike was a Yamaha FZS600 (about 70hp I think) but I quickly got bored with that and moved on to a Triumph 955i Daytona with 130hp. It was fine, I obviously didn’t die.

As long as you apply common sense and realise that any bike with 100+ hp is going to be VERY fast compared to almost any car, then they’re no harder to ride than a 50hp bike. I think it’s more a case of whether you’re comfortable with the size and weight of a bike like a 955i Sprint?

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Hi and welcome in!

I have also never ridden a sprint - the seat height doesn’t look too bad as you mention your height, but for me (5ft4 on a tall day) it’s all about the width of the seat and length of your legs - for example my Fireblade has slightly taller seat than my husband’s Tuono, but my Blade is narrow at the front so I can get my toes down, whereas the Tuono is slightly wider and would be pretty precarious for me. Also for me a well - balanced bike is key with short legs.

In terms of power, my first bike after a 125cc was my 2021 Street Triple R and I was fine on it even though it’s fairly powerful. I was well aware of what I had and just applied common sense. It is however very light which I think does favour a newer rider. The Sprint is quite heavy I think?

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Hi @Tristan-m. Great to have you along for the ride.

Here’s my opinion. The right bike for you after passing your test is very much dependent on how you feel about the step up. It doesn’t matter so much what you choose, the important thing is whether you feel comfortable riding it. That’s down to things like the weight and power of the bike, and also your size and strength.

When I passed my test in the 90’s I bought a Suzuki VX800 and was very happy. My partner bought her first big bike a couple of years ago, a Ducati 848 Streetfighter, but it was too tall for her. She loved it but was never 100% confident riding it. She’s recently changed it for a Ducati Supersport and admits that it feels better to ride, if not quite as madly exciting.

For some, the new Triumph 400’s or Trident will be a perfect stepping stone. Others may go straight for a Fireblade and be happy. Not that they’ll be getting the best out of it with limited experience.

If you can, get a few test rides and see how you feel on the bikes. You’ll go quicker and be happiest on a smaller bike if that’s what you’re more confident riding.

Let us know how you get on.

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Hi and welcome to the forum. The key for me is it doesn’t matter on what bike you step up to, but that you feel comfortable when sitting on it or moving about when parking. If it feels right here, when you get the bike moving it will feel fine.

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Welcome aboard :sunglasses:

It’s difficult for me to recommend the leap because I worked my up from a 50, to a 125, to a 350, to a 500 and then a 900 over a period of years.

However, I did have a Sprint 1050 GT until recently and, at 6ft tall and in my late 50s, I found it too big and heavy for every day use.

I would have thought a good 1+ hour test ride would help you to decide though.

Good luck :+1:

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Totally agree thankyou for comment

Thankyou , totally agree

That’s a good point. Another aspect of feeling comfortable with the bike. I’d add that I sometimes see people, especially newer riders, leaning the bike heavily into their body because they’re afraid it’ll tip away from them. That makes any bike more difficult to manoeuver. If I did that with my Sprint GT I’d probably end up under it. :grin: Balance the bike, move carefully and, as you say, make sure you feel in control.

Same age, practically the same height. It is cumbersome but manageable. I certainly appreciate the MV afterwards!.

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Welcome in @Tristan-m , and good luck with your DA test.
About 35 yrs ago now but I went straight from a 125 to a CBR600F, I assume you will be riding something in between during you DA training so it won’t be quite as big a shock. As others have already said the power is not an issue, you don’t have to use all of it to start with.
I had a 955i SprintST for about 8 years, a fine bike, you’ll find it feel quite “planted” to ride and a bit slow steering, but I think the biggest question mark will be its weight (combined with your limited height). I would dare to suggest you’re probably going to drop it at some point when wheeling it about or at slow speed on a cambered road. That’s no slur on your abilities, we’ve all done it (self included), it’s a “rite of passage” for most bikers. Replacing/repairing damaged body panels can be difficult/expensive and off putting for someone new to bikes, it’s important not to set back your growing confidence/enthusiasm.
By all means give the Sprint a try if possible, but my recommendation would be a Street Triple of similar vintage and fit it with crash bungs if not already on. IMO a better bet as a “first big bike”, it’s plenty fast enough, more agile, and real world faster than the Sprint, so you won’t get bored with it any time soon.
Whatever you choose (doesn’t HAVE to be a Triumph) come back and let us know how you get on.

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Cheers . Will do

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I’m 5ft 5ins (on a good day!) with an inside leg measurement of - optimistically - 29ins. I’m 74 years of age (in a few days time) and have been riding motorcycles for the last 58 years - no breaks (except tib & fib on two occasions :wink:), though my riding in this country has been ‘weather selective’ for many years now, but that’s because I like looking at my bikes almost as much as I like riding my bikes. Odd but true.

One, and perhaps the most important of reasons that the modern motorcycle test regime was introduced into this country was as a way to try to stem the evergrowing number of fatalities of young, inexperienced riders on comparatively very powerful, very fast and sometimes not very manageable motorcycles.

Anyway, all that is not meant simply to brag about personal credentials or offer the pretence that I’m some kind of expert - I’m not - but it does, I think, give me some credibility to offer real world experience to temper the advice I can offer. And that advice would echo VERY strongly everything that @Col_C has said. The 955 Sprint is a tall, heavy bike, albeit somewhat lower & lighter than it’s immediate predecessor. That isn’t meant to imply that you wouldn’t be able to handle it, or wouldn’t be able to manage all aspects of it - riding, moving, maintaining and anything else required, BUT … why would you willingly risk a drop when there are eminently sensible alternatives available? That risk becomes even more problematic when you add into the risk/reward equation the fact that the T500 series have been out of production for quite a long time now and parts sources are becoming almost as difficult as for their carb’d predecessors. I’d venture to suggest (without actually knowing) that a broken 955i Sprint fairing will be almost as difficult to replace as that for a T300 carb’d Sprint.

As well as the big, heavy carb’d bikes I own and ride, I also own a 2010 Street Triple 675 and can wholeheartedly endorse and agree with everything Col says about them. It might be a - physically - ‘small’ bike but to say it punches way above its weight category is an enormous understatement. It has the capability to do everything the Sprint does - except keep the wind blast off you - and with, potentially, considerably more poise and grace. If you need the sportier appearance, then a 675 Daytona will certainly fulfill your wettest of dreams - the early versions with the triple outlet, underseat exhaust are sex on wheels, IMHO, and far better, aesthetically and practically, than the Sprint, though I’d have to say I’m not sure anyone would want to tour long distance on a standard one - my back and knees start to ache just thinking about that!!

Seriously, open up your range of possibilities. You wouldn’t, I expect, knowingly expose yourself to risk in most areas of life without giving a lot of thought to the means and mechanisms available to you to mitigate that risk.

Owning, managing and riding a motorcycle are, almost by definition, serious risk activities - do what you can to prevent or minimise that risk up front and the outcomes should be far more enjoyable in the long term. Good luck with the test, and good luck with your search for and purchase of a suitable ‘post test’ machine on which to enjoy a safe, long and happy riding ‘career’!!

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As has been said by others already you need to ensure that you feel comfortable, not physically but mentally, when riding the ST. With your 29” inside leg measurement the seat will have to be fairly narrow for you to have any chance of flat footing the machine, which has a seat height of 800 mm.

Also the bike is a bit of a clunk at 250 kg, probably in the region of twice the weight of the 125 that you are currently riding. You mention a specific year of manufacture so I assume you have a particular machine in mind? The only way to find out is to try it once you are fully licenced.

Others have mentioned a Street Triple which will still give you the exemplary triple engine with almost identical power output from the 765 lump with 80 kg less weight and, if you find a LRH model, a 780 mm seat height which you will be more suited to.

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Welcome to the forum and good luck with the test.

I would agree with what’s been said about your first “big” bike - feeling comfortable on it and comfortable moving it about are important.

A lighter bike will help you gain confidence and I would also suggest a Street Triple over the Sprint for that reason.

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Welcome to the forum, Tristan. Lots of sensible advice and comments here. I would just add from my own experience that an easily handled light or middleweight bike is more fun to ride than something too big and heavy. Modern middleweight bikes have all the power you could ever want.

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