Sludge trap plug removal

Remember this from a few weeks ago? These are a bugger to get out most of the time but when they’ve been screwed in the whole way along with threadlock and then the allen key drive has been rounded off, they are a bit bigger of a bugger…


I thought about stitch drilling a line to get a slit to drive a bar into then trying to turn it out. I also wondered about welding a nut to the plug. But I thought I’d have to apply as much torque as a Rocket III and so I decided to drill the whole thing out…

Makes a bit of a mess, that will need to be cleaned pristinely/fantastically/excellently/really well, once done. Took as much as I dare out to the threads with a grinding bit…

And then started to run a 7/8 x 20 tap into the thread…

Which started to break up the remainder of the plug stuck in the threads with the locktight…

Phew, that seemed to work ok. Applied some fire and pulled out the remains of the plug…

And here’s what’s left of the little sod…

Ran the tap through the thread with some cutting compound and all looks ok…

Then threaded the sludge trap tube and pulled that…well, that was a nice new one wasn’t it? Not…

And then spent a happy hour or so thoroughly cleaning bits of metal out of the crankshaft…Just for interest note the timing slots in the flywheel that allow the T140s to be timed fairly easily by sticking a screwdriver through the timing hole in the casing.

All clean and awaiting a polish of the journals. Will then size and order shells… :slightly_smiling_face: thankyou, welcome…over…

12 Likes

I wish I had half of your skills. :+1:t3:

2 Likes

Thankyou.
I am now a mistrustful type of fellow - I’ve given enough money away having my trousers pulled down by cowboys - so I try out my own cowboy skills that I make up as I go along. It’s always a bit scarey opening up an engine I haven’t seen before. But it increases my collection of tools. :slightly_smiling_face:
Oh, and worn out old Triumph spares.

2 Likes

Half? I’d settle for a single percent! I wouldn’t mind a bit of the character to go with them, too, please.

I live in eternal (well, as eternal as possible in the meagre residue left of my time on this mortal coil!) hope but very little expectation.

Welcome. Over. :saluting_face:

2 Likes

Another stunning recovery job, awesome :100:

1 Like

Thanks, I hope it’ll reward me and start once it’s all put back together along with the very long list of new parts from Feked and Sammy Miller :robot:

1 Like

Know anything about BSA’s? Bantam Major I have rotting away… would love to do it up. I have the engine in another shed… too far gone maybe?

2 Likes

@Andyc1 thatll go again!!

2 Likes

Yep, that’ll be a good project for you. A little two stroke that doesn’t look that bad. These are clearing 3 grand these days and a Police one with leg guards and a screen, phew, skys the limit! Clean off the bird poo first though… :upside_down_face:

3 Likes

Good luck with your project @Andyc1 a thread on your progress would be a great read.

4 Likes

Cracking project, it’s mostly there and bantam parts are readily available, that reg no is worth a few quid if you have any paperwork

2 Likes

Just for completeness. Here’s the newly cleaned up sludge trap with a new tube already inserted, the oil feed to the big ends can be seen. This must not be blocked in any way. The engine will still have oil pressure but the flow would be impeded.


So here’s the nice new plug having it’s thickness measured. It’s roughly 10mm for you metricnesses.

Measuring sticks have this feature of a little tail that pokes out the length it’s just measured. So here’s the same measurement in comparison to the oil feed.

So the plug can be screwed all the way into the crank until it is flush, no more.

Reused some of the pop marks to keep the plug in place.

New shells were needed. Given the recent rebuild with +10 thou. shells by the dealer they were pretty well marked up. This may be due to an inadequate supply of oil caused by the previous plug being screwed too far in.

New bolts, nuts and the rods are back on. Torqued up they fall easily under their own weight. Note the writing on the rods just to make sure I put them back on the right way… :slightly_smiling_face:…over

5 Likes

There is something soothing about nice shiny cranks and con rods, or is it just me :grinning:

1 Like

No, not just you… :sunglasses:

2 Likes